How To Network Your Way Into Your Next Job

Even after four years of schooling it would be expected that a graduate would have the necessary skills to conduct themselves in the job market. But even with all the time and money invested students are finding the need to enter graduate school. The Rutgers work trends division found that “62% believe they will need more formal education if they are to be successful in their chosen careers” (Godofsky, Zukin, Van Horn 18). This may further their entrance into the job market and increase the debt total that has accumulated. But on the other hand they can gain valuable work experience considering many graduate students become teacher assistants or lab techs with the professors in their area of study.

If you work a full-time job, and have a family, finding 18 hours out side of that to study your course work will be difficult. It is better to either work part-time or take less coursework.

Another idea for student jobs is to try work study. Most work study positions are tied to financial aid but often you can find something that is in your major. Check with your financial aid office if you have applied and see if this is one possibility.

TIP: When Mom and dad could not afford the barber we sought out a beauty school or barber college. Students worked on our hair under the watchful eye of licensed stylists. Depending on your income, a shampoo, cut and style can be free or just a nominal charge.

A broad resume — that tells the person with whom you’re meeting the most about you. You’ll use this for about half of your job conversations. It’s best for a general conversation where there’s no job opening at stake, and the person with whom you’re talking doesn’t work in one of your career fields of interest.

As you near the end of college, you’ll start to realize you’re not going to be there forever. If you are smart, you’ll already have started deciding what you want to do next, such as attending graduate school, getting a professional job, or starting a business. There’s no way of knowing where you’ll end up for sure, but it will help a lot if you start making contacts both within the college and in the fields you want to pursue. Ask your professors, your career center counselors, alumni, whoever you can. You are so much more likely to get where you need to go if you know the right people.

Attend events, such as fundraisers, community events, and networking meetings (you can do a search for networking groups in your city to get this information).